Spring Kings

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Thanks to Sweta Agrawal for sharing some snapshots of her success this season finding the “Spring King.”  Persistence is key when trying to locate this mushroom.  It seems that you have to check your spots regularly and catch them just at the right moment if you want to have any real success.

Keeping things simple like the salad pictured above is a great way to enjoy the more subtle flavors of this enigmatic mushroom.  On the other hand, you can get quite decadent.  If you were lucky enough to find as plentiful of patches as Sweta you can try all sorts of recipes.

Having not found any Boletus rex-veris myself I can’t comment much on distinguishing features.  I have a feeling though, that if you have found Boletus edulis in the fall and saw one of these Ceps during spring growing in front of you, alarms would sound and the hunt would be on.  Names and seasons aside a Porcini is a Porcini.

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Some specimens grow quite large and will be enough for a few meals.  But remember,  the more you pick the more you’ll have to clean.  Always clean your mushrooms in the field as best possible.  Doing so makes kitchen chores much more enjoyable.  Also, make sure to check for bugs in the field by cutting your mushrooms in half.  Remove buggy areas immediately.  The bugs will continue eating the mushroom, even after being picked and wreak havoc after a long ride home from the mountains.

If you didn’t find any Spring Kings don’t fret yet.  The season is not over for Boletes and Boletus edulis the fall cousin of Boletus rex-veris will be fruiting later this year.  So read up and scout some locations while out hiking this summer.

sdr

 

Deep Fried Morels, a Dud?

Deep Fried Morels

by Brady Raymond

How could you go wrong deep frying Morels?  How could you go wrong stuffing them with jalapenos and cream cheese, coated with breadcrumbs?  Well, maybe it’s just too much.  Deep frying Morels is something I’ve wanted to try for a while now and with Erin’s help, we did our best.  They weren’t really bad and I did enjoy eating them, the only problem was that the flavor of the Morel was kind of lost.  How do you remedy flavor lost?  It’s not like you can just add bacon and boom you’ve got the perfect recipe.  And you can’t amplify the Morel flavor either, or can you?  While I do recommend frying most foods, this idea needs some tinkering before I can say it’s a delicious way to eat Morels.

We are out of fresh Morels for the season and it seems like that is necessary for at least the vessel of this recipe, however, we have been thinking of a Morel sauce to drizzle over top and a little less breadcrumb and well, maybe some bacon too.  I’ll let you know next year if it’s a keeper.  Email me if you’ve had success deep frying Morels.  psmsblog@gmail.com

Deep Fried Morels, cream cheese, jalapanos

Morels with Scallops and Asparagus

 

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Thyme flowers are a great addition if you have them in your herb garden

 

by Erin Raymond

I recently saw a post by Langdon Cook on Instagram of a meal with morels and scallops that looked amazing.  I had never had morels with scallops, but decided I needed to try it immediately.  Fortunately, a couple days after I decided this, Brady and I found a couple pounds of morels.  I looked at a number of different recipes online and combined them into the recipe below.  It was delicious!  Thanks for the inspiration Langdon!

Begin by roasting the asparagus in the oven with a bit of olive oil and cook wild rice pilaf.  Melt butter in a pan and sautee the morels and shallots until the mushrooms are cooked through.  Turn the heat up to medium and add the scallops, turning once.  Add some cream when flipping the scallops.  Once the scallops are done, serve over wild rice pilaf and top with fresh thyme and asparagus.

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A Simple Oyster Mushroom Breakfast

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Fried eggs on english muffins with oyster mushrooms and fresh herbs

by Erin & Brady Raymond

Saute the oyster mushrooms in butter on medium high until they start to look crispy. Once they look done,  put them on a plate with a paper towel to soak up the excess butter while cooking the eggs and toasting the english muffins.  This breakfast comes together pretty quickly and the fresh parsley and thyme really set it off.

Often times keeping it simple yields delicious results, case in point.  It was exciting to find our first oysters of the year too, and that surely made such a simple recipe that much more rewarding.  We noticed a number of small oysters growing on a log, too small to harvest, just before we found this nice little clump (pictured below).  The weather has been perfect as of late and I’m sure anyone who takes the time to look for dead Alder trees will find themselves eating some oyster mushrooms too.

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Savoring the PNW truffle

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by Sweta Agrawal

Back in April, Alana McGee, one of the co-founders of Truffle Dog Co. spoke at our members meeting and regaled us with tales of truffles from around the world and the PNW. I’ve made it a tradition to get a small amount of these truffles every year, and I was lucky enough to get both native blacks and spring whites from her last month.

Truffles have a reputation for being some of the most expensive food in the world. And, while truffles certainly cost more than most other mushrooms, they’re actually not too bad — for one, PNW truffles don’t have the vaunted reputation of the Perigord or Italian white, so they’re a little cheaper. And two — a little bit of truffle goes a LONG way!

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Eat Morels, Some Ideas

by Erin & Brady Raymond

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Erin’s quick recipe,

Scrambled Eggs, Morels and Toast

Homemade whole wheat bread, toasted. Topped with scrambled eggs and fried morels.
Morel batter – egg, flour, a bit of garlic powder, cayenne, salt and pepper to taste.

Brady says,

Mmm, and this is breakfast.  What a way to start the day.”  

 

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Erin’s quick recipe,

Morel Crostini

Homemade whole wheat bread, with olive oil toasted at 425.
For the morel cream topping:
Melt a fair amount of butter in a sauce pan. Add chopped garlic and shallot. Cook for a few minutes. Add chopped morels and sauté slowly for about 10 minutes. Add cream and continue to cook until the cream has thickened. Let cool for a few minutes. The sauce will continue to thicken as it cools. Add salt and pepper to taste. Top with chive flowers, if you have them.

Brady says,

 “You’ve got to be kidding me, morels for breakfast and now appetizer!  Mmm mmm mmm!”  

Yeast Rolls with Mushrooms

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These rolls were easy to make and you could get very creative with different mushroom filling variations.  The dough was delicious and the crust turned out nice and flaky.

This recipe is from the January 1994 edition of Spore Prints and was submitted by Patrice Benson, who was incredibly active in PSMS and served as president from 1994-1996 and 2006-2010.  She cooked the first morels I ever ate in a class I took through the club.

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You can find all editions of Spore Prints online in our Spore Prints Archive on our website.